a RAWky road

Food, health and fitness advice while vegan in a sad, S.A.D world.


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Fitness Library – Get Inspired and Drop The Excuses While Dropping The Weight

For me it’s important to be stimulated in various ways (books, movies, videos, magazines, blogs, etc…) in order to be consistent in regards to my goals. These books have been tremendously helpful, great resources and inspiring reads. If I had to choose one book to recommend to anyone interested in upping their fitness, running, ultrarunning and vegan athletes, it would be Eat & Run by Scott Jurek.

I’m interested in getting a few books on ballet, but that’ll come further down the line. Please, if you have any suggestions on the subject I would be delighted to hear from you, as well as other books on running, cycling and/or hiking.

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Eat & Run – Scott Jurek

“In pursuing the mental side of endurance, Jurek uncovers the most important secrets any runner can learn.”—Amby Burfoot, author of The Runner’s Guide to the Meaning of Life

For nearly two decades, Scott Jurek has been a dominant force—and darling—in the grueling and growing sport of ultrarunning. Until recently he held the American 24-hour record and he was one of the elite runners profiled in the runaway bestseller Born to Run.

In Eat and Run, Jurek opens up about his life and career as a champion athlete with a plant-based diet and inspires runners at every level. From his Midwestern childhood hunting, fishing, and cooking for his meat-and-potatoes family to his slow transition to ultrarunning and veganism, Scott’s story shows the power of an iron will and blows apart the stereotypes of what athletes should eat to fuel optimal performance. Full of stories of competition as well as science and practical advice—including his own recipes—Eat and Run will motivate readers and expand their food horizons.

“Jurek’s story and ideas should easily manage to speak to and cheer on anyone seeking to live life as fully as possible.”—Denver Post

“A shockingly honest, revealing, and inspiring memoir.”—Trail Runner

A Life Without Limits – Chrissie Wellington

In 2007, Chrissie Wellington shocked the triathlon world by winning the Ironman World Championships in Hawaii. As a newcomer to the sport and a complete unknown to the press, Chrissie’s win shook up the sport. A LIFE WITHOUT LIMITS is the story of her rise to the top, a journey that has taken her around the world, from a childhood in England, to the mountains of Nepal, to the oceans of New Zealand, and the trails of Argentina, and first across the finish line.

Wellington’s first-hand, inspiring story includes all the incredible challenges she has faced–from anorexia to near–drowning to training with a controversial coach. But to Wellington, the drama of the sports also presents an opportunity to use sports to improve people’s lives.

A LIFE WITHOUT LIMITS reveals the heart behind Wellington’s success, along with the diet, training and motivational techniques that keep her going through one of the world’s most grueling events.

Born To Run – Christopher McDougall

Born To Run – A Hidden Tribe, Superathletes, and the Greatest Race the World Has Never Seen – by Christopher McDougall is an epic adventure that began with one simple question: Why does my foot hurt? Isolated by Mexico’s deadly Copper Canyons, the blissful Tarahumara Indians have honed the ability to run hundreds of miles without rest or injury. In a riveting narrative, award-winning journalist and often-injured runner Christopher McDougall sets out to discover their secrets. In the process, he takes his readers from science labs at Harvard to the sun-baked valleys and freezing peaks across North America, where ever-growing numbers of ultra-runners are pushing their bodies to the limit, and, finally, to a climactic race in the Copper Canyons that pits America’s best ultra-runners against the tribe. McDougall’s incredible story will not only engage your mind but inspire your body when you realize that you, indeed all of us, were born to run.

Biking Portland – Owen Wozniak

As anyone who’s ever rolled two wheels into the City of Roses knows, biking is an undeniable part of Portland’s identity. So what better way to explore a city celebrated for its green parkways, bike culture, and one-of-a-kind geography?

Your guide to the area’s best routes is avid cyclist and bike commuter Owen Wozniak, a Portland resident and former researcher for the city’s bicycle infrastructure. Wozniak’s done his homework to bring you Biking Portland: 55 Rides from the Willamette Valley to Vancouver, offering 55 must-bike routes from downtown Portland along the river, into the greenways of the Tualatin basin, through the Clackamas countryside, and across the Columbia to destinations like Cedar Creek and Cape Horn.

Features include a detailed map for each route, 75 photographs, a keying of each ride by type – residential, urban, rural, non-motorized and public transit directions to the start of all 55 routes in addition to standard driving directions. Each cycling route features turn-by-turn descriptions, mileage logs, photos, maps, and elevation profiles, while sidebars throughout the guide showcase Portland’s rich biking heritage with fascinating anecdotes. Rides range across skill levels with a balance between easy, moderate, and strenuous here you’ll find routes for families, Portland newcomers, and seasoned Oregon road warriors.

60 Hikes Within 60 Miles – Paul Gerald

Updated maps, new hikes, even more rankings and categories, fresh photography, and useful backpacking options make the newest edition of this authoritative guide to Portland’s best day hikes the most exciting yet. 60 Hikes Within 60 Miles: Portland by Paul Gerald profiles 60 select trails that give outdoor adventurers a little of everything there is to enjoy around Portland: mountain views, forest solitude, picturesque streams, strenuous workouts, casual strolls, fascinating history, fields of flowers, awesome waterfalls, and ocean beaches. Whether readers want a convenient city bus ride to the flat and fascinating Washington Park, a bumpy drive to Lookout Mountain, or the thigh-burning experiences that are Kings and Elk Mountains, this book lets them know what to bring, how to get to the trailhead, where to go on the trail, and what to look for while hiking.

Going Long – Edited by David Willey

For more than 40 years, Runner’s World magazine has been the world’s leading authority on running—bringing its readers the latest running advice and some of the most compelling sports narratives ever told. From inspirational stories such as “A Second Life”(the story of Matt Long, the FDNY firefighter who learned to run again after a critical injury) to analytical essays such as “White Men Can’t Run” (a look at what puts African runners at the front of the pack), the magazine captivates its readers every month.

Now, for the first time, the editors of Runner’s World have gathered these and other powerful tales to give readers a collection of writing that is impossible to put down.

With more than 40 gripping stories, Going Long transcends the sport of running to reach anyone with an appetite for drama, inspiration, and a glimpse into the human condition.

The Complete Book of Running for Women – Claire Kowalchik

More women than ever are discovering the unique benefits of running — for stress relief, weight management, endurance, and self-esteem. Women’s bodies are not the same as men’s, and though we can train just as hard and with the same passion for excellence, we have certain special concerns. Finally, there is a comprehensive guide exclusively for women who experience the pure joy of running, or want to.

It’s the simplest, fastest, most accessible way to fitness and good health known to woman. You don’t need a partner, equipment, or even much time. Now, Claire Kowalchik, former managing editor of Runner’s World magazine, answers every question about the overwhelmingly popular activity that builds endurance, melts fat, and even prevents illness. In this total running book for women, you’ll learn:

  • How to get started and stay motivated
  • What to eat for optimal nutrition
  • How to run during pregnancy and after menopause
  • Why running is the most effective form of exercise
  • How to prevent and treat injury
  • What to wear — from sports bras to running shoes
  • How to prepare for everything from a 5K to a marathon

Authoritative and friendly, The Complete Book of Running for Women is a sourcebook for both beginners and long-time runners. Along with wisdom drawn from the author’s personal experience, you’ll find advice from the experts: coaches, exercise physiologists, nutritionists, doctors, and other women runners. Including question-and-answer sections and a complete list of resources, The Complete Book of Running for Women tells you everything you need to know to be off and running toward better health and richer living.

Finding Ultra – Rich Roll

The incredible true story of the author’s remarkable transformation, at the age of 40, from out-of-shape average Joe into one of the world’s best endurance athletes

On the eve of his 40th birthday, Rich Roll was in bad shape. His days were filled with work, stress, and junk food, and his nights were spent on the couch, remote in hand. Taking out the trash was the closest he came to exercise, and, at 50 pounds overweight, a walk up the stairs left him winded. He decided it was time to make a change.  After undergoing a diet detox, adopting a vegan lifestyle, and pushing his fitness regimen to undreamed-of heights, he was profiled by Men’s Fitness as one of the world’s 25 fittest men. Among Roll’s many jaw-dropping athletic feats: he completed the unprecedented “Epic 5”–five back-to-back Ironman-distance triathlons on five different Hawaiian islands in under a week–an achievement many said was impossible. This is the story of that remarkable transformation, a complete physical and spiritual rejuvenation that proves that anyone can “find ultra” if they know how.

Cycling Science – Max Glaskin

Cycling Science tours readers through a wide variety of topics, from tire rolling resistance and the difference between yield strength and ultimate strength, to the importance of aerodynamics and the impact that shaved legs have on speed. Each chapter explores a different subject—fundamentals, strength and stability, materials, power, aerodynamics, and the human factor—and is organized around a series of questions: What is the ideal frame shape? What is the biggest source of drag? What keeps a bicycle from falling over? How much power can a cyclist produce? Which muscles does cycling use? Each question is examined with the aid of explanatory diagrams and illustrations, and the book can be used to search for particular topics, or read through for a comprehensive overview of how machine and rider work together.
Athletes have much to gain from understanding the science of their sports, and Cycling Science will be a must-read for cyclists of all stripes—professionals, recreational riders, and anyone seeking to enhance their enjoyment of cycling.
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An Account For My Hiatus

A week is not a long time to take a break from posting on a blog. However, a RAWky road is my outlet and I’ve missed it, so let me account for my hiatus.

After my food poisoning I decided to go raw to clean out my system and it worked. The problem was that our fruit wasn’t ripe yet so I couldn’t carb up as much as I wanted (don’t worry, I was still eating). Consequently, I was rather tired and moody, as well as struggling with cravings and I just wasn’t inspired to write.

I had forgotten how amazing bananas were. I plan on reintroducing them as a staple to our diet because they really turned my digestion around and I am so thankful. It’s actually impressive how healing they are and I might even dedicate an entire post to them here pretty soon.

I’ve also been busier than usual this past week. I decided to challenge myself for the month of June and do some sort of activity everyday of the month. So far I’ve cycled 24.5 miles, ran 6.9 miles of trails, hiked 9.9 miles and done Ballet Beautiful (I’m hooked, review coming at some point) twice.

I’m a bit sore already, but I’m also not trying to overdo it by going all out. I think it’s important to be active everyday and after yo-yo exercising and multiple running injuries over the years I know my limits. I’m immensely proud of my first week as I had been quite sedentary March through mid-May and I’m looking forward to what’s in store for the rest of the month.

I do expect to get back into the swing of posting more regularly, but first I have a small backlog of posts from last week that I intend on posting either today or tomorrow… stay tuned.

Hope you all have had a great weekend and remember: sleep, sugar, water, sweat!